How Poor Dental Health Leads To Diabetes & Hypertension



We can also get diabetes and hypertension because of your poor oral health. 

“Life is a mixture of sugar and spice”, oh yes we all truly agree with that phrase, we always think that taking too much sugar will cause diabetes and too much salt will cause hypertension and probably we say this to our mom, dad, uncle, aunt and etc mostly during Diwali or Christmas time when they indulge themselves in the sea of food. Recently, I saw an advertisement which showed that the man gets angry when he doesn’t find food and not only food he seems pretty much angry at everything and this relates to that it’s because of his high blood pressure and not because of his angry mood swings. But do you think that’s the only reason, well sometimes it’s the other way round. Yes, you got me! We can also get diabetes and hypertension because of your poor oral health.

So, let’s figure out what could be the reasons:

 

DIABETES

Diabetes is a disease which is caused when the body doesn’t produce sufficient insulin hormone which converts sugars to energy.

A few years ago I had a patient who complained that he felt dryness in the mouth, bleeding gums, loose teeth, and ulcers sometimes. He tried everything but nothing helped then after looking at the symptoms I advised him to go for a blood check-up. As predicted his reports showed very high blood sugar levels and were put on medication. It was because of the poor dental health he had developed diabetes.

 

 A TWO- WAY RELATIONSHIP!

 In a review by American Dental Association stated that there is a two-way relationship between oral health and diabetes. So it wouldn’t be wrong if we say one can lead to other. The reason behind is that poor oral health increases the blood glucose level which leads to diabetes.

Few oral problems associated with diabetes are –

  • Dryness in the month due to less saliva
  • Inflamed gums
  • Infections – candidiasis
  • Cavities
  • Ulcers

 

HYPERTENSION

The ideal blood pressure that we know is 120/80 mmHg and above this, you will be considered hypertensive. According to the World Health Organization, the daily intake of salt should be about 2.4 grams for adults. Poor oral health can not only cause diabetes but can also lead to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases as reported by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A study among 3,600 people reported that people who have lower blood pressure have good oral health and respond well to medications than those with high blood pressure. It has been seen that people with greater than 120 mmHg had more gum diseases which indicate higher pressure of blood against the walls of the arteries. The associated dental problems include bleeding of gums, cavities, infections in a month and reduced saliva due to medication.

 

What should be done for prevention?

  • Brushing twice daily
  •  Using floss
  • Visit your dentist once every 6 months

It’s always necessary to maintain good overall health which includes proper food intake, healthy lifestyle, physical exercise and maintaining good hygiene which will help to combat all the problems in long run.

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